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THE Orion MPCV

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NASA’s Orion spacecraft is built to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before. Orion will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel, and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities.

Orion's first flight test, called Exploration Flight Test-1, will launch this year atop a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 37. This test will evaluate launch and high speed re-entry systems such as avionics, attitude control, parachutes and the heat shield.

In the future, Orion will launch on NASA’s new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. More powerful than any rocket ever built, SLS will be capable of sending humans to deep space destinations such as an asteroid and eventually Mars. Exploration Mission-1, scheduled for 2017, will be the first mission to integrate Orion and the Space Launch System.

 

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PERFORMANCES and INFO'S

The Orion has 4 Seats for Lunar Missions, and 6 for non - Lunar. Has a diameter of around 5 Metre ( 16.5 feet ) and Powered By Solar Panels . The Launch date is planned for 2014 and the Contractor was Lockheed Martin. Mass 22.7 Metric tons. And the budget for development is estimated at $8 billions . The Inhabitable volume of the Orion is 380 cubic feet .

 

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ORION MPCV

An expanded view of Orion and its spacecraft adapter and launch escape system (2009).

 

Orion Rescue and Recovery Training

 


Orion Rescue and Recovery Training

A model of Orion, NASA's next vehicle for human space exploration, awaits recovery in Johnson Space Center's 40-foot deep Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory. NASA engineers worked with U.S. Navy divers to test procedures for recovering the Orion capsule when it lands off the coast of Baja, Calif., next year during its first flight test, Exploration Flight Test-1. Orion will travel 3,600 miles into space – 15 times higher than the International Space Station – before it returns for a landing in the Pacific Ocean.

 


 

Send Your Name on NASA’s Journey to Mars, Starting with Orion’s First Flight

 

 

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If only your name could collect frequent flyer miles. NASA is inviting the public to send their names on a microchip to destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, including Mars.

Your name will begin its journey on a dime-sized microchip when the agency’s Orion spacecraft launches Dec. 4 on its first flight, designated Exploration Flight Test-1. After a 4.5 hour, two-orbit mission around Earth to test Orion’s systems, the spacecraft will travel back through the atmosphere at speeds approaching 20,000 mph and temperatures near 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean.

But the journey for your name doesn’t end there. After returning to Earth, the names will fly on future NASA exploration flights and missions to Mars. With each flight, selected individuals will accrue more miles as members of a global space-faring society.

"NASA is pushing the boundaries of exploration and working hard to send people to Mars in the future,” said Mark Geyer, Orion Program manager. "When we set foot on the Red Planet, we’ll be exploring for all of humanity. Flying these names will enable people to be part of our journey."

The deadline for receiving a personal “boarding pass” on Orion’s test flight closes Friday Oct. 31. The public will have an opportunity to keep submitting names beyond Oct. 31 to be included on future test flights and future NASA missions to Mars.

To submit your name to fly on Orion’s flight test, visit:

http://go.usa.gov/vcpz

Join the conversation on social media using the hashtag #JourneyToMars.

For information about Orion and its first flight, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

 

 

 

     
This animation depicts the proposed test flight of the Orion spacecraft in 2014. During the test, which is called Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), Orion will launch from Cape Canaveral, Fla., perform two orbits, reaching an altitude higher than any achieved by a spacecraft intended for human use since 1973, and then will re-enter and land in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of the United States. Narration by Jay Estes, Deputy for flight test integration in the Orion program.
 
NASA is making steady progress on building the Orion spacecraft, which will take astronauts deeper into space than ever before. Take a look at the latest achievements and milestones in "Orion: From Factory to Flight" as Orion gets ready for its first orbital test flight in 2014.

 

 

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