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SLS

The Next - Generation Spacecraft

Artist Concept: Space Launch System Takes Flight

Artist Concept: Space Launch System Takes Flight

Artist concept of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) 70-metric-ton configuration launching to space. SLS will be the most powerful rocket ever built for deep space missions, including to an asteroid and ultimately to Mars. The first SLS mission -- Exploration Mission 1 -- will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to a stable orbit beyond the moon and bring it back to Earth to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft’s re-entry and landing prior to a crewed flight.

Image credit: NASA/MSFC

 

PRESS RELEASE 2014 AUGUST 27

NASA Completes Key Review of World’s Most Powerful Rocket in Support of Journey to Mars


NASA officials Wednesday announced they have completed a rigorous review of the Space Launch System (SLS) -- the heavy-lift, exploration class rocket under development to take humans beyond Earth orbit and to Mars -- and approved the program's progression from formulation to development, something no other exploration class vehicle has achieved since the agency built the space shuttle.

"We are on a journey of scientific and human exploration that leads to Mars," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "And we’re firmly committed to building the launch vehicle and other supporting systems that will take us on that journey."

For its first flight test, SLS will be configured for a 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capacity and carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft beyond low-Earth orbit. In its most powerful configuration, SLS will provide an unprecedented lift capability of 130 metric tons (143 tons), which will enable missions even farther into our solar system, including such destinations as an asteroid and Mars.

 

NASA's Journey to Mars

NASA's Journey to Mars

NASA is developing the capabilities needed to send humans to an asteroid by 2025 and Mars in the 2030s – goals outlined in the bipartisan NASA Authorization Act of 2010 and in the U.S. National Space Policy, also issued in 2010.
Mars is a rich destination for scientific discovery and robotic and human exploration as we expand our presence into the solar system. Its formation and evolution are comparable to Earth, helping us learn more about our own planet’s history and future. Mars had conditions suitable for life in its past. Future exploration could uncover evidence of life, answering one of the fundamental mysteries of the cosmos: Does life exist beyond Earth?
 

 

While robotic explorers have studied Mars for more than 40 years, NASA’s path for the human exploration of Mars begins in low-Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station. Astronauts on the orbiting laboratory are helping us prove many of the technologies and communications systems needed for human missions to deep space, including Mars. The space station also advances our understanding of how the body changes in space and how to protect astronaut health.
Our next step is deep space, where NASA will send a robotic mission to capture and redirect an asteroid to orbit the moon. Astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft will explore the asteroid in the 2020s, returning to Earth with samples. This experience in human spaceflight beyond low-Earth orbit will help NASA test new systems and capabilities, such as Solar Electric Propulsion, which we’ll need to send cargo as part of human missions to Mars. Beginning in FY 2018, NASA’s powerful Space Launch System rocket will enable these “proving ground” missions to test new capabilities. Human missions to Mars will rely on Orion and an evolved version of SLS that will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown.
A fleet of robotic spacecraft and rovers already are on and around Mars, dramatically increasing our knowledge about the Red Planet and paving the way for future human explorers. The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover measured radiation on the way to Mars and is sending back radiation data from the surface. This data will help us plan how to protect the astronauts who will explore Mars. Future missions like the Mars 2020 rover, seeking signs of past life, also will demonstrate new technologies that could help astronauts survive on Mars.
Engineers and scientists around the country are working hard to develop the technologies astronauts will use to one day live and work on Mars, and safely return home from the next giant leap for humanity. NASA also is a leader in a Global Exploration Roadmap, working with international partners and the U.S. commercial space industry on a coordinated expansion of human presence into the solar system, with human missions to the surface of Mars as the driving goal. Follow our progress at
www.nasa.gov/exploration and www.nasa.gov/mars.
Artist Concept, SLS 70 Metric Ton Configuration

Artist Concept, SLS 70 Metric Ton Configuration

An expanded view of an artist rendering of the 70 metric ton configuration of NASA's Space Launch System, managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. A version of the integration adapter rings, highlighted above, will be used on Exploration Flight Test-1 in 2014 and the first long-duration test flight of the Space Launch System in 2017.
Image credit: NASA/MSFC

 

This decision comes after a thorough review known as Key Decision Point C (KDP-C), which provides a development cost baseline for the 70-metric ton version of the SLS of $7.021 billion from February 2014 through the first launch and a launch readiness schedule based on an initial SLS flight no later than November 2018.

Conservative cost and schedule commitments outlined in the KDP-C align the SLS program with program management best practices that account for potential technical risks and budgetary uncertainty beyond the program's control.

“Our nation is embarked on an ambitious space exploration program, and we owe it to the American taxpayers to get it right,” said Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot, who oversaw the review process. “After rigorous review, we’re committing today to a funding level and readiness date that will keep us on track to sending humans to Mars in the 2030s – and we’re going to stand behind that commitment.”

"The Space Launch System Program has done exemplary work during the past three years to get us to this point," said William Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Explorations and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "We will keep the teams working toward a more ambitious readiness date, but will be ready no later than November 2018.”

SLS Architecture Reference Configuration

SLS Architecture Reference Configuration

An artist rendering of the various configurations of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The flexible configuration, sharing the same basic core-stage, allows for different crew and cargo flights as needed, promoting efficiency, time and cost savings. The SLS enables exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit and support travel to asteroids, Mars and other destinations within our solar system.
Image credit: NASA

 

The SLS, Orion, and Ground Systems Development and Operations programs each conduct a design review prior to each program’s respective KDP-C, and each program will establish cost and schedule commitments that account for its individual technical requirements.

"We are keeping each part of the program -- the rocket, ground systems, and Orion -- moving at its best possible speed toward the first integrated test launch,” said Bill Hill, director Exploration Systems Development at NASA. "We are on a solid path toward an integrated mission and making progress in all three programs every day."
“Engineers have made significant technical progress on the rocket and have produced hardware for all elements of the SLS program,” said SLS program manager Todd May. “The team members deserve an enormous amount of credit for their dedication to building this national asset.”

The program delivered in April the first piece of flight hardware for Orion’s maiden flight, Exploration Flight Test-1 targeted for December. This stage adapter is of the same design that will be used on SLS’s first flight, Exploration Mission-1.

Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans has all major tools installed and is producing hardware, including the first pieces of flight hardware for SLS. Sixteen RS-25 engines, enough for four flights, currently are in inventory at Stennis Space Center, in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where an engine is already installed and ready for testing this fall. NASA contractor ATK has conducted successful test firings of the five-segment solid rocket boosters and is preparing for the first qualification motor test.

SLS will be the world's most capable rocket. In addition to opening new frontiers for explorers traveling aboard the Orion capsule, the SLS may also offer benefits for science missions that require its use and can’t be flown on commercial rockets.

The next phase of development for SLS is the Critical Design Review, a programmatic gate that reaffirms the agency's confidence in the program planning and technical risk posture.

For more information about SLS, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/sls

 

A Masterpiece and Outstanding Hightechnological Spacecraft of the next - generation, which will bring The Human Spaceflight deeper into Space than ever before. As Flagship of the United States and ready for Exploration Flight Test 1 in 2014, The Orion MPCV will begin a New Era of Spaceflight history to far beyond Low Earth Orbit. Rigorously Tested, and Designed to be Flexible for Crew, Cargo and Instrumental Missions, the Orion will be the State - of - the Art Spacecraft, for Human Exploration needs the coming decades. To reach the goals and extended deep space missions up to 6 months, Orion Engineers developed This next - generation Spacecraft with unique life support, propulsion, thermal protections and avionic systems .

 


 

The ORION MPCV With Solar Panels

ORION MPCV

PERFORMANCES and INFO'S

The Orion has 4 Seats for Lunar Missions, and 6 for non - Lunar. Has a diameter of around 5 Metre ( 16.5 feet ) and Powered By Solar Panels . The Launch date is planned for 2014 and the Contractor was Lockheed Martin. Mass 22.7 Metric tons. And the budget for development is estimated at $8 billions . The Inhabitable volume of the Orion is 380 cubic feet .

 

THE MPCV

The Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is Designed and Created to meet the evolving needs of The United States and The World's beyond low Earth Orbit Space Exploration Programs for the coming decades, perhaps Centuries. Dozens of Technology Advancements and Innovations from more than 50 Years Experience Spaceflight Research and Development are Incorporated into the Design and Subsystem of the Spacecraft.

         
         
 
The ORION MPCV Parachute Flight Test 2014 January 16 in Arizona .
 
The ORION MPCV and The SLS. The Space Launch System
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HRP

The Human Research Program, has the resposibility and mission to discover and apply the Best methods and technologies to support safe, productive far beyond low Earth Orbit Human Space Travels .
As the Flagship of The United States next - generation Space fleet,The ORION will push the envelope and Exploration needs of Human Spaceflight far beyond low Earth Orbit.

SLS

The SLS or The Space Launch System is the high - lifted Rocket which will Launch the Orion in the Upcoming Missions Into Deep Space.

The Lagrange Points

The Lagrangian points (pron.: /ləˈɡrɑːniən/; also Lagrange pointsL-points, or libration points) are the five positions in anorbital configuration where a small object affected only by gravity can theoretically be part of a constant-shape pattern with two larger objects (such as a satellite with respect to the Earth and Moon). The Lagrange points mark positions where the combined gravitational pull of the two large masses provides precisely the centripetal force required to orbit with them.

 

Lagrange points

The Lagrange Points

The Lagrangian points (pron.: /ləˈɡrɑːniən/; also Lagrange pointsL-points, or libration points) are the five positions in anorbital configuration where a small object affected only by gravity can theoretically be part of a constant-shape pattern with two larger objects (such as a satellite with respect to the Earth and Moon). The Lagrange points mark positions where the combined gravitational pull of the two large masses provides precisely the centripetal force required to orbit with them.

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Planet Mars

THE CLIMATE OF MARS
Of all the planets in the Solar System, the seasons of Mars are the most Earth-like, due to the similar tilts of the two planets' rotational axes. The lengths of the Martian seasons are about twice those of Earth's, as Mars's greater distance from the Sun leads to the Martian year being about two Earth years long. Martian surface temperatures vary from lows of about −143 °C (−225 °F) (at the winter polar caps) to highs of up to 35 °C (95 °F) (in equatorial summer). The wide range in temperatures is due to the thin atmosphere which cannot store much solar heat, the low atmospheric pressure, and the low thermal inertia of Martian soil. The planet is also 1.52 times as far from the Sun as Earth, resulting in just 43% of the amount of sunlight.

MOONS MARS  

The Moons Of MARS

Mars has two relatively small natural moons, Phobos (about 14 miles in diameter) and Deimos (about 8 miles in diameter), which orbit close to the planet. Asteroid capture is a long-favored theory, but their origin remains uncertain. Both satellites were discovered in 1877 by Asaph Hall; they are named after the characters Phobos (panic/fear) and Deimos (terror/dread), who, in Greek mythology, accompanied their father Ares, god of war, into battle. Mars was the Roman counterpart of Ares. In modern Greek, though, the planet retains its ancient name Ares(Aris: Άρης).

     

 

MPCV

 

 

 

Credits : wikipedia.org | nasa.gov | Theorionproject.nl